Reviews of Ellis Paul Essentials

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Reviews of Ellis Paul Essentials

Postby KarenZ » Thu Oct 26, 2006 8:50 am

Folks,

If you find any online (or other) reviews of Ellis Paul Essentials please post them in this thread.

KarenZ
Last edited by KarenZ on Wed Jan 03, 2007 9:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby KarenZ » Thu Oct 26, 2006 8:54 am

Folks,

Arthur Wood, Folkwax contributing author, has written this review of Ellis Paul Essentials. I really like Arthur. ;)

A Stunning Place, (10/26/06)

In a recording career spanning some eighteen years, Essentials apart, Ellis Paul has released a dozen albums. Within the foregoing total are two live recordings, the most recent being the limited edition Live At Club Passim, New Year's Eve 2005, plus there was that early 21st century collection of cover songs compiled with his musical partner in crime Vance Gilbert. In the process of releasing those albums, Ellis Paul has placed a tad over one hundred of his own compositions in the public domain. Essentials, a two-CD career retrospective, features thirty-one of the latter, albeit that two are previously unheard, plus there's one cover song, fittingly, Mark Erelli's "The Only Way." When Erelli first burst on the scene in the late 1990s he was compared to Paul, but via a handful of stunning solo releases Mark has proved he is a totally unique contributor to the contemporary Folk process. Paul's cover of "The Only Way" is the most intelligent post-9/11 assessment of how to move forward that I've heard. It first appeared on Side Of The Road, the Ellis/Vance collaboration. It's also a truly inspired selection.

When it comes to selecting someone's best work, some fans are obviously going to be disappointed because their personal favourite didn't make the cut. In my case that would have been "King Of 7th Avenue" from Stories [1994]. The latter is the album that launched my journey with Ellis (one that's still on track) and to me "King Of 7th Avenue" remains one heck of a powerful creation. Like an old photograph (a rather familiar one appears on the rear of the CD booklet and a handful more feature on the inside of the rear tray card) Philo Records has cast the liner artwork in shades of sepia. I guess sepia is the colour of history and that's the principle thrust of Essentials. Furthermore that (plural) word was undoubtedly the pick for this collection title since it possesses a certain sonic synergy with Ellis.

So where do we begin? Seventeen tracks in length, on Disc One, one cut is a spoken introduction. Essentials is launched by the melodically easy-going swagger of "Take Me Down," a tale of travel and parting. It first appeared on the Jerry Marotta-produced Translucent Soul [1998] and later on Live [2000]. Based on a real-life event that occurred in Paul's hometown in Maine (although not involving him personally) "Eighteen" is a tale of coming of age and comes complete with an oh-so-eloquent Duke Levine mandola solo. The decade-old "Paris In A Day" amounts to a whirlwind city travelogue. Ellis is supported on the latter by the voice of the divine Patty Griffin, who somehow manages to sound remarkably like Kate Rusby.

Disc One includes new interpretations of five songs that appeared on Paul's most recent solo studio outings; chronologically, The Speed Of Trees [2002] and American Jukebox Fables [2005]. Taken from the latter, "Home" is the first revision. Subjectively inspired by a house in Maine that Paul bought, loved dearly, and then had to sell, he found solace in the unavoidable parting by burning the property down in the lyrics of a song. The other studio revisions are the love-affair-conducted-at-arm's-length, "Maria's Beautiful Mess," and the later segue of "If You Break Down" and "Words," all from The Speed Of Trees. Produced by John Jennings, these new interpretations feature J.T. Brown (bass), Dave Mattacks (drums), Don Conoscenti (guitar), and Ellis. In addition, Jennings played electric guitar, keyboards, and piano.

I stated earlier that there were five new versions and Disc One closes with a bare-bones, April 2006 reading of "Jukebox On My Grave," recorded in Ellis' Virginia kitchen. "If She's The One," a new song that takes the seeking and finding of love as its theme, was co-written with Flynn, producer of American Jukebox Fables. Other highlights on Disc One include the superbly surreal "Angel In Manhattan," Y2K's live version of "Did Galileo Pray?" and the almost-new "Snow In Austin," which made its debut on Live At Club Passim, New Years Eve 2005. And finally let's give special mention to "Conversation With A Ghost." The version here, complete with a Patty Griffin's backing vocal, is a heartfelt tribute to a close friend who passed many years ago, and this song rightfully brought the Mainer to the attention of Boston's Folk audiences.

Disc Two also features a spoken intro and it prefaces the closing cut, "God's Promise," an edited Guthrie lyric for which Ellis composed the tune. The second disc begins with "Sweet Mistakes," the title track of the Y2K album Paul recorded in Decatur, Georgia, with producers Kristian Bush and Don McCallister. Next up is his best-known road song "3000 Miles," it remains a firm fan favourite and first appeared on Stories [1994] and later on Live [2000], but it's the remixed Sweet Mistakes version that appears here. The road and locations where it has taken Ellis appear again in the lyrics of "Blacktop Trains," "Midnight Strikes Too Soon" (NYC), and "Alice's Champagne Palace" (Homer, Alaska). "Autobiography Of A Pistol" succinctly delivers its message in the line "You see guns don't kill people, it's the bullets that do," while "The Martyr's Lounge" imagines a bar in heaven peopled by dead Rock stars and other celebrities, some of whom didn't die from natural causes. A deliberately perverse scenario, it raises the question, why are some of them there? In "All Things Being The Same," taken from the Duke Levine-produced Stories, the principle character is a Decatur barfly so Paul grabbed the opportunity to mention Eddie's Attic, which is located in the city and according to the musician is "one of my favourite clubs in America."

The new song on Disc Two is the John Jennings-produced "Welcome Home To Maine." Ellis was commissioned by that state's governor's office to write the song about the state of his birth and was happy to do so. Far from being averse to tackling controversial subjects, in "She Loves A Girl" Paul paints a portrait of a family who disown their daughter because of her sexual preference. The Mainer rarely co-writes songs, but Slaid Cleaves and Jeff Plankenhorn were his collaborators on "She Was," written in the Texas Hill Country on the 120-plus-mile journey from the Quiet Valley Ranch on Highway 16 to Austin, Texas. Originally a track on American Jukebox Fables the version featured here was recorded at Boston's Somerville Theatre during April 2006. In the penultimate song, "The Speed Of Trees," the lyric focuses (poetically speaking) on relationships and faithfulness and was the title cut of his 2002 album. Like the closing cut, "God's Promise," "The Speed Of Trees" was recorded during a January 2006 concert in Paul's beloved Maine. The venue was Boothbay's Opera House.

If you've never visited "musically" with Mr. Ellis Paul, Essentials is a stunning place to start. I retain no doubts whatsoever that you'll rather quickly be totally hooked. As for his long-time supporters, there's enough new material on Essentials to makes it more than just another tired old "Best of..."

Arthur Wood is a founding editor of FolkWax


KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby wendy » Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:52 am

Yes, sir! He has my vote of confidence! :D
(thanks Karen, as always)
-wendy

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Postby Sue Ellen » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:43 am

What a great article, thank you for posting that.

Sue Ellen
"...I implore you, I entreat you, I challenge you to speak with conviction, to say what you believe, in a manner that bespeaks the determination with which you believe it, because contrary to the wisdom of the bumper sticker, it is not enough these days to "question" authority, you have to speak with it, too."
Taylor Mali, "Like, You Know?"

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Postby paddyinthepub » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:21 pm

Arthur Wood and his website Folkwax has long been a favorite spot on the web for me. And if I forget, they email me once a month lettin me know the latest issue has arrived. He really knows his music, and I've even read reviews he's done that were less than glowing. So he's an honest reviewer.

I'm not surprised he's into Ellis Paul.

Thanks for the link to this review of Essentials......Miss Z :wink:
"once we're inside, it's a carnival ride" ~ ellis paul
paddy

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Postby KarenZ » Wed Nov 08, 2006 7:26 pm

As usual, Fish Records has a clue. ;)

Fish Records Review of Ellis Paul Essentials

KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby Richard + Jela » Fri Nov 10, 2006 4:35 pm

I think that I have Arthur Wood to thank for introducing us to EP's music as it was after an article in Kerrville Kronikle many years ago that prompted a CD purchase and we've not looked back since.

We actually met him almost a year ago when we went to a Tracy Grammer House Concert and he's ceratinly not afraid to give an honest opinion. We do set great store by his reviews and are delighted with this latest one for 'Essentials'

Jela

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Postby KarenZ » Wed Jan 03, 2007 8:44 am

Folks,

Here's a link to the FAME review of Ellis Paul Essentials.

FAME Review of Ellis Paul Essentials

KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby Patti » Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:26 am

Don't you just love a great review!!! Thanks for the link Karen.

Was't it said the Rounder was not going to be really promoting this CD till the new year, should we start the radio requests and phone calling again?

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Postby PotatoPicker » Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:47 am

Would have been nice to have a few Essential CDs at the New Year's Eve show for sale....... although I guess the flip side i sthat it sold well earlier in the week and left them empty-handed.
Jeff

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Postby bonuela » Wed Jan 03, 2007 4:56 pm

That is a great review. It is clearly written by a music lover. A lot of reviews leave me wondering if the author sees listening to the subject as a chore.
I let my music take me where my heart wants to go. ~ Cat Stevens

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Postby PotatoPicker » Thu Jan 04, 2007 10:53 am

Thanks for reminding me - I forgot to mention how much I enjoyed the review, and could feel the true appreciation of the music and the artist in her write-up. Great review, and thanks for pointing us to it !
Jeff

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Postby KarenZ » Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:35 am

Folks,

Joe Ross has written a nice review of Ellis Paul Essentials:

Joe Ross' Review of Ellis Paul Essentials

KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby Sue Ellen » Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:46 am

I especially appreciate this comment:

Joe Ross wrote:Ellis' voice has much character, and his songs understand the bond between land, life, heart and soul.
"...I implore you, I entreat you, I challenge you to speak with conviction, to say what you believe, in a manner that bespeaks the determination with which you believe it, because contrary to the wisdom of the bumper sticker, it is not enough these days to "question" authority, you have to speak with it, too."
Taylor Mali, "Like, You Know?"

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Postby KarenZ » Fri Jan 12, 2007 10:05 am

And I really appreciated the last two sentences:

Ellis Paul's imagination and skill are both polished and fanciful all in one. He is a masterful singer/songwriter. (Joe Ross)


That Joe Ross is on the ball. ;)

KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby wendy » Fri Jan 12, 2007 10:50 am

Very nice! And I like your choices of quotes :)
Thanks for the link, Karen!
-wendy

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Postby taysavedaduckie » Sat Jan 13, 2007 1:07 pm

For your reading pleasure, here's the article I wrote for my student newspaper on the Club Passim NYE show/Ellis Paul Essentials :)

Ellis Paul kicks off 2007 with ‘Essentials’
Living Arts
Krista Perry, Connector Editor

As part of a New Years Eve tradition, Ellis Paul kicked off the New Year the same way he has for the past twelve years: igniting Club Passim in Cambridge with an outstanding performance.
Accompanied by Don Conoscenti and Radoslav Lorcovic, the trio performed Paul’s expertly crafted songs with vigor and animation between themselves and the audience. A mix of tunes new and old, reflecting the October release of Ellis Paul Essentials, offered both longtime fans and new listeners a variety of their favorite folk, rock, and love songs.
The Essentials album, a compilation of 32 songs showcasing Paul’s career as a performing songwriter, was constructed with fan input: “I picked the songs I knew had to be on it, like ‘Maria’s Beautiful Mess’ and ‘3,000 Miles’…the staples of what I do, and that was about 10 or 12 songs,” Paul said. “Then I took a poll on the website among all my fans [for the rest]. There were still probably 6 or 7 songs that I wish could have been on it but it was too much.”
The album comes after 15 years as a touring musician: Paul, who didn’t pick up a guitar until his 20’s, made a name for himself in the folk community, and catapulted his career with an awing stage presence and pure talent. “If I had never started playing guitar, I’d probably be homeless,” he said. “I wouldn’t be an airline pilot or a male stripper. There are things I’m not cut out to do, and being an artist really fits every aspect of my personality.”
Paul has earned respect as a master songwriter as well as an enticing performer. “A good storyline, good visuals, and a striking melody are essential to a good song,” he said. “I’m trying to capture either a person or a story or an emotion… I’m not trying to write for the marketplace or the radio or for my record label. I’m just trying to say something that I think is important.”
The atmosphere of Club Passim served Paul well; no stranger to the club, his undeniable talent and witty stage interaction with Conoscenti and Lorcovic made for a warm, relaxed show. Paul’s set opened with a new song, “Summertime”, a story song on piano with concrete images and a fresh way of looking at the cliché of summer romance.
“Right now, I’m just trying to write the perfect story song,” he said. “That’s what my next album will be. Maybe after that I’ll do a little bit more experimenting with other genres.”
Audience interaction during the show was heightened due to the intimate setting and Paul’s story telling introductions that have become as big a part of his performances as the music itself. Paul, Lorcovic, Conoscenti, and opening artist Flynn moved offstage and into the audience seating area to deliver an optimal performance of “Blacktop Train”, a song written from the perspective of the famous Route 66.
Other show highlights included the trio’s cover songs of “Karma Chamelon”, CCR’s “Have You Ever Seen The Rain”, Johnny Cash’s “Ring Of Fire”, and Van Morrison’s “Crazy Love”.
“I’m praying I get to do this for the rest of my life,” Paul said.
Krista

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Thank You

Postby JennyLevE » Sun Jan 14, 2007 10:23 am

Great Piece!!
Thanks for sharing! :D
--Jen
“Tell me which part
Is it the CASTLE, or the SAND
That you miss when the TIDE comes along?”
-- Ellis Paul

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Postby bonuela » Mon Jan 15, 2007 5:56 pm

taysavedaduckie wrote: “I wouldn’t be an airline pilot or a male stripper. There are things I’m not cut out to do, and being an artist really fits every aspect of my personality.”


This might be my favorite quote ever! :mrgreen: Having been on the receiving end of more than one "folk singer lap dances" I would have to disagree. And I'm not even the one who pulled out the dollar bills New Years. :P


Thanks for the great review, and for sharing it with us! :D
I let my music take me where my heart wants to go. ~ Cat Stevens

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Postby wendy » Wed Jan 17, 2007 12:25 pm

Cool review! And thank for sharing. Wish I could write like that... :roll:
-wendy

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Postby KarenZ » Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:20 am

Folks,

This article in the June 29, 2007 Washington Past includes a nice review of Essentials.

Ellis Paul Essentials - by Mike Joyce

KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby KarenZ » Thu Aug 23, 2007 6:57 am

Folks,

I found this really nice review of Essentials in Sing Out magazine.

Sing Out!
Vol. 51, #1
Spring, 2007

"Good things come in small packages" is an understatement when describing the distillation of Paul's 15-year career into a beautifully packaged, 2-disc compilation that couldn't have been done better. Intelligent choices and sequencing showcase the many facets of Paul's writing, influences and production, complete with Paul's own song descriptions. Paul's Essentials is just that and a must for your folk collection. -- Kari Estrin


KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby KarenZ » Wed Sep 05, 2007 8:29 am

Folks,

Here's a nice review of Essentials just posted on the Music Dish web site:

Best of the Batch: Ellis Paul Essentials

KarenZ
"Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world's greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see." -- Ann Patchett in Bel Canto.

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Postby Richard + Jela » Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:36 am

Torquing voice


What a description - I love it!

Jela

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Postby paddyinthepub » Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:59 am

Matt is the man!!! I even sent him an email to that effect!!!

Great piece on Essentials....makes me want to buy it all over again!! :lol:
"once we're inside, it's a carnival ride" ~ ellis paul
paddy

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Postby herve » Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:35 am

DOn't know if anybody speaks French around here but here is the review published in issue #49 Crossroads of French music mag Crossroads.

ELLIS PAUL ****
Essentials (2 CD)
BlackWolf/Philo, Import
Crème de la crème du songwriting, côté Boston
www.ellispaul.com

Déjà 18 ans de carrière et une douzaine d’albums à son actif pour Paul Plissey, alias Ellis Paul. Ce double-album édité par Philo, sous-label de Rounder, tombe à pic pour faire le point sur la carrière du gamin de Presqu’Ile, Maine : 34 morceaux répartis sur 2 galettes, issus de 8 albums, dont cinq nouvelles versions de chansons déjà publiées, quatre live inédits et deux nouveautés en studio. Je sais, on est encore à des années lumière du générique d’Astérix et Cléopâtre !

Les fans (il y en a en France, même si je n’ai pas souvenir d’avoir lu beaucoup d’articles sur Ellis par ici…) apprécieront évidemment tout ce qui fait le sel de cette compilation : les relectures de chansons déjà connues, les titres « live » et les inédits. Commençons par les chansons réenregistrées, toutes récentes : « Home » est la première chanson jamais écrite au piano par Ellis et initialement enregistrée pour American Jukebox Fables, son dernier album en date (2005). « If You Break Down », « Words », et « Maria’s Beautiful Mess » tous trois tirés de Speed of the Trees en 2002, cette dernière étant ici enregistrée live en studio. La cinquième chanson revisitée est « Jukebox on my Grave », à la fois épitaphe et ADN musical d’Ellis. Cette version toute simple, enregistrée dans la cuisine, confirme que des arrangements trop riches peuvent tuer une chanson. Les morceaux live inédits me semblent davantage intéressants : « Snow in Austin », comme son titre l’indique, est une chanson d’hiver, écrite pendant un trajet de quatre heures entre Austin et Houston, stylo à la main et calepin scotché au volant. Deux guitares acoustiques et un piano accompagnent le p’tit gars de Nouvelle Angleterre paumé dans un Texas enneigé où les cactus se déguisent en sapins de Noël, les armadillos jonchent les bas-côtés le ventre en l’air et les bonhommes de neige tiennent leur balai comme une guitare ! Les autres bonus live sont « She Was » co-écrite avec Slaid Cleaves et Jeff Plankenhorn et enregistrée comme « Snow in Austin » avec Don Conoscenti à la guitare et Radislov Lorkovich au piano. « Speed of Trees » live en solo démontre combien Ellis, sa voix et sa guitare savent créer un univers unique, un monde à part qui entraînent le spectateur ailleurs. Ce que confirme « God’s Promise », dont les paroles ont été écrites par Woody Guthrie. Norah Guthrie, administratrice du fonds paternel, a proposé à plusieurs songwriters de choisir dans un recueil de textes inédits celui qu’ils souhaiteraient mettre en musique. C’est grâce à ce type de démarche que le folk reste bien vivant aux États-Unis, de génération en génération. « Did Galileo Pray », l’un de morceaux préférés du public d’Ellis, est également live, mais dans la version du double album sorti en 2000.

Les nouveautés, enfin : sur un rythme roulant, la vitre baissée, le coude à la portière, « Welcome Home To Maine » est une chanson presqu’officielle, puisque commanditée par le gouverneur de l’état (ça n’a rien à voir, mais j’ai vu que sur les grands panneaux postés sur le bord des highways, le Connecticut accueille ses visiteurs en s’excusant d’être l’état de naissance du « Texan » George W. Bush… Les états non plus ne choisissent pas leur famille). Résidant désormais en Virginie, Ellis n’a semble-t-il eu aucun mal à imaginer le paysage de son Maine natal, ses petites routes, ses champs de pommes de terre et sa côte à homards. « If She's The One », elle aussi écrite en voiture (c’est une habitude, on dirait !), est un exemple type de la rencontre sonore entre l’apport folk d’Ellis et l’univers électrique et « produit » de son comparse Flyn. Grâce à Internet, on peut écouter des choses fabuleuses à la radio et en entendant des versions « à l’os » des titres les plus récents, on mesure sans problème la qualité des compositions.

Comme souvent dans ce genre d’exercice, ce sont les titres les plus contemporains qui se taillent la part du lion aux dépens des premiers albums (que je vous recommande chaudement, c’est de saison). Six titres seulement pour Say Something (un « Conversations with a Ghost » magique, avec le regretté Johnny Cunningham au violon et Patty Griffin aux harmonies), Stories (« All Things Being The Same, « Autobiography of a Pistol » et « Paris in a Day », snapshot en 4 minutes d’une journée à Paris) et A Carnival of Voices (bon choix avec « Deliver Me » et Midnight Strikes Too Soon ») contre quatre extraits pour Translucent Soul (1998) sans conteste un très bel album, quatre également — et c’est plus surprenant — pour Sweet Mistakes (2002) et trois pour American Jukebox Fables. Je n’ai pas fait le total, mais on doit pas être loin du compte avec « The Only Way » gravé sur Side of the Road en 2003 et que son auteur, Mark Erelli, vient d’enregistrer sur son dernier album Hope and Other Casualties (lire la chronique dans le dernier numéro).

Vous l’aurez compris, Ellis Paul compte depuis une dizaine d’années parmi mes songwriters et interprètes préférés grâce à une vraie marque de fabrique, loin des trois accords réglementaires et du pont syndical en mineur, à des mélodies qui surprennent toujours par leur originalité, à un jeu de guitare facilement reconnaissable (sa guitare highstrung sur « Did Galileo Pray », par exemple) et à une voix fine, parfois haute perchée mais jamais crispante (qui a parlé de Jimmie Dale Gilmore ? On n’est pas à Lubbock, bon sang !). Vous en conviendrez, cela fait tout de même pas mal d’atouts dans la manche de ce digne représentant d’une génération qui commence à s’imposer sur un terrain sacrément miné, balisé d’un côté par les songwriters « historiques » qui, à l’image des vieux bluesmen, n’entendent pas lâcher le mojo, pardon, le morceau (ce dont personne ne les blâmera) et, de l’autre, les jeunes pousses dont les premiers albums peuvent être de vraies belles surprises (on reparlera de Justin Rutledge et de Jack Harris). J’allais oublier les néo-folkeux dont les pauses unplugged séduisent les radios, les télés et même les publicitaires. On n’est jamais tranquille …

À découvrir également, le Live at Passim enregistré les 30 et 31 décembre 2005 et commercialisé au bénéfice de ce club qui a tant fait pour la survie et le renouveau de la musique folk en Nouvelle Angleterre (www.clubpassim.org pour découvrir ce lieu mythique situé en face de l’Université d’Harvard), le DVD 3000 Miles, comprenant un concert (12 titres captés live au Somerville Theater de Boston en 2001 avec Susan Werner, un road trip, des cours de guitares pour découvrir les open tunings maison d’Ellis Paul et des interviews et enfin le bouquin Notes From The Road (And The Songs I Sang There) publié par Blackwolf Press. Ouf, c’est bientôt Noël !

Jacques-Eric Legarde

À ranger entre Woody Guthrie et Shawn Colvin.

paddyinthepub
Posts: 3768
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:44 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby paddyinthepub » Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:51 am

I don't speak french.... :(

But I'd know creme de la creme, anywhere!!!

Say...light bulb over head moment here..... :idea:

Send this review to French Teachers across the land....tying the french lesson into something kids can relate to...ie....they play Essentials in the class as a companion piece to the lesson.

50 bucks...consulting fee.

:lol:
"once we're inside, it's a carnival ride" ~ ellis paul
paddy


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